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Reading encouragement for youths

Brick-books

Since my good friend Lola mentioned it, I started going through the picture publications at WeHeartIt, now and then. A soothing activity that tells you a lot about how global society lives nowadays. I found it to be somewhat like Pinterest, but with even less words, just images.

I have to recognize that, depending on the day, I may relax visiting We Heart It by feeling I’m not doing exactly anything or, on the contrary, I may get overstressed by the sight of an infinite parade of slim youngsters in their underwear, tossed with witty phrases.

Among these, I saw that there exist several publications of this kind linked to literature. Most of them aren’t related to classics, but to popular up-to-date bestsellers. And that’s where my light bulb started working. Using catchy images and phrases linked to the art of reading and the joy it brings may help creating a new feeling of belonging, something lost for many youths these days (or at least that’s my feeling in Spain).

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Adjectives to describe characters

image

An easy way to get youngsters to use the load of adjectives we teach them at school is to make them think about (or link them to) something they enjoy.

During the first sessions of the Reading Workshop we will go through several adjectives describing personality and appearance to find out what type of characters move them.

We will also look into the distinction between flat and round characters as presented by E.M Forster in his book Aspects of the Novel (1927), and use it to classify the characters we find along the workshop.

Which should I choose?

I’m preparing our next storytelling session, based on Peter Pan.

We are not doing any follow up activities after the storytelling, this time, so I was wondering what song to choose to round up the gathering.

On the one hand, it has to be a song linked to the thematic of the story – that’s  easy, I thought; Peter Pan has got all the ingredients that children love: Indians, mermaids, fairies, fantasy, mystery, fights, even some romance… so I said to myself, it should be easy to find such a song…

But, in this case, the answer is not so obvious. The partakers are 25 children of between six and eight years old. Their mother tongue is either Spanish or Basque. By now, they have generally had an introductory encounter with the language, maybe as much as two school years, but they don’t master the language yet… in fact they are far from that.

Therefore, I have two possible pirate songs, but I am well aware that they are not going to grasp the lyrics just by listening once.

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Storytelling & Storymaking in the Basque Country

Tell-Tale What? offers storytelling sessions built around the classics in English language adapted to a non-native public, especially to young children whose L1 is Spanish and/or Basque.

At the same time, Tell-Tale What?’s proposal is to give participant children the opportunity of integrating their creative capacity to the learning of a second language.

If you are located anywhere outside the Basque Country and wish to know more about our workshops and budget, please contact us, WE LOVE TRAVELING!

Christmas-Carol

Christmas Carol 2012

Please find more information at the specific sections!